Military Police

SPRING 2014

Military Police contains information about military police functions in maneuver and mobility support, area security, law and order, internment/resettlement, and police intelligence operations.

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MILITARY POLICE . 19-14-1 24 By Lieutenant Colonel Gerald G. Mapp A ll U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) employees who deploy to Afghanistan volunteer to do so. While some may have previous military experience, many do not attend tactical training before they deploy. For an interagency law enforcement element to work effectively in the dangerous and complicated environment of Afghanistan, two skills are paramount—the ability to conduct self-defense operations and the ability to conduct coordination and joint operations with U.S. and other military forces. As the DEA mission in Afghanistan expanded, the importance of providing these skills to personnel before their deployment became increasingly obvious; however, the capacity to provide these skills was not an organic DEA training system capability. In February 1980, following the December 1979 Soviet Union invasion of Afghanistan, the DEA closed its offce in the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, ending 9 years of drug enforcement efforts in that country. In 2002, DEA personnel accompanied the frst U.S. diplomatic team to return to the previously abandoned embassy. In 2003, the DEA reestablished the Kabul Country Offce and began working with the State Department and the Department of Defense (DOD) to reestablish a counternarcotics capability within the Afghan Ministry of Interior. The initial emphasis of the DEA was on helping the nascent Counternarcotics Police of Afghanistan stand up its Narcotics Interdiction Unit, which has an advanced training and tactical capability that allows it to execute tactical counternarcotics operations throughout the country, targeting opium bazaars, heroin laboratories, and opium/heroin storage sites. Given the realities of conducting law enforcement operations in an active combat zone, this was a considerable challenge. Afghanistan plays a prominent role in the global heroin trade, accounting for most of the heroin produced worldwide. 1 Accordingly, the DEA Kabul Country Offce maintains a signifcant presence in Afghanistan. DEA personnel perform 2-year tours of duty, working shoulder to shoulder with the Narcotics Interdiction Unit and members of the Sensitive Investigative Unit—a vetted and mentored unit capable of conducting complex, long-term investigations—to target the highest echelons of the Afghan heroin trade. Afghanistan represents a chal- lenging environment for the DEA. DEA personnel in Afghanistan sup- port the counternarcotics objectives of the Government of Afghanistan, the U.S. government, and the inter- national community by routinely executing law enforcement opera- tions in conjunction with their Nar- cotics Interdiction Unit and Sensi- tive Investigative Unit counterparts and select International Security Assistance Force partners in some of the most hotly contested regions of the country. At the same time, DEA works closely with the International Security Assistance Force to ensure that counternarcotics operations support the counterinsurgency campaign objective of remov- ing sources of funding to the Taliban and other insurgent or terrorist groups. Meeting this objective requires that DEA personnel acquire a skill set which is unique among U.S. law "For an interagency law enforcement element to work effectively in the dangerous and complicated environment of Afghanistan, two skills are paramount— the ability to conduct self-defense operations and the ability to conduct coordination and joint operations with U.S. and other military forces." Mapp.1.indd 26 3/21/2014 1:00:52 PM

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